Lecture

Leader of global fight against modern slavery to speak at Mitchell

He’s been honored by the U.S. Attorney General for leading the largest slavery prosecution in the history of the United States. He’s received the Paul & Sheila Wellstone Award from the Freedom Network for his work on behalf of victims of human trafficking. In 2009, President Obama asked him to coordinate U.S. government activities in the global fight against modern slavery.

Ambassador Luis CdeBaca was appointed by President Obama to coordinate U.S. government activities in the global fight against contemporary forms of slavery.

Ambassador Luis CdeBaca was appointed by President Obama to coordinate U.S. government activities in the global fight against contemporary forms of slavery.

He’s Ambassador Luis CdeBaca, senior advisor to the secretary of state and leader of the State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, which leads the Unites States’ global engagement on the fight against human trafficking. On Tuesday, Nov. 19, he’ll visit William Mitchell to talk about how the lessons of emancipation can be applied to the fight against modern slavery.

Ambassador Luis CdeBaca
“Civil and Human Rights in the 21st Century:
The Lessons of Emancipation in the Fight Against Modern Slavery”

Tuesday, Nov. 19 | 5–7 pm
William Mitchell College of Law Kelley Boardroom
875 Summit Ave.
St. Paul, Minn.

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The United States government considers trafficking in persons to include all of the criminal conduct involved in forced labor and sex trafficking, essentially the conduct involved in reducing or holding someone in compelled service.

According to Ambassador CdeBaca, as many as 27 million men, women, and children are involved in trafficking victims around the world at any given time.

During his lecture, CdeBaca will discuss the evolution of civil and human rights law and how, 150 years after the U.S. made the promise of freedom—long after slavery’s abolition was written into the U.S. Constitution—a great deal of work remains to be done. The ambassador will take questions from attendees, and a reception will follow.

His lecture is free and open to the public.

Learn more about the Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons

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