Poverty Law (5065)

This course challenges students to think about whether the law is or can be an effective anti-poverty strategy. We will review general information about poverty, the history of anti-poverty advocacy in the United States, the development of free legal services for the poor, and the role of the Constitution as the poor's protector. Students will gain introductory skills in several substantive areas of poverty law practice, for example, housing, government benefits, consumer, and child welfare law. The instructors use a variety of teaching methods with an emphasis on experiential learning. All students will complete a group project and presentation on a topic of their choice related to poverty and the law.

Grading: Combination of in-class exams, assignments and projects.

Prerequisite(s): Co-requisite: Constitutional Law Liberties

Credits: 2

Offered: Spring

Categories:
Elective

Subject Areas:
Poverty Law:: edit ::

Taught by: Sharon Fischlowitz Amber Hawkins

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